Schrödinger’s Combo Product

NADA has recently published a model policy for properly selling F&I products, i.e., without running afoul of the Attorney General.  It includes the disclosure formerly known as the AutoNation Pledge, and a new procedure which seems to be taking the place of the old-school waiver form.  I say “seems” because there is no mention of the old form, which I believe has something to do with nuclear physicist Erwin Schrödinger.

Prior to the sale of a VPP, the Dealership will request the customer’s acknowledgement of the election to purchase or decline each selected VPP or VPP bundle.

As everyone knows, subatomic particles exist in an indeterminate state until they are pinned down by measurement.  For example, if you have a radioactive isotope of Cesium, you can’t tell whether it has decayed until you aim your Geiger counter at it.  Not only can you not tell what state the atom is in, it is not definitely in any state until you measure it.

To show how this contrasts with traditional physics, Schrödinger proposed the following thought experiment.  Imagine there is a cat in a box with the Cesium rigged to kill the cat when it decays.  According to the Uncertainty Principle, the cat is both alive and dead at the same time.

Similarly, the F&I waiver requires each product to be either accepted or declined.  You bought the dent protection, so it prints in the green column, but you turned down roadside assistance.  It prints in the red column.  To save a few dollars, you are willing to leave your family stranded.  Please sign here to confirm.

But what if dent and roadside – and key and windshield – are part of the same bundle?  You only bought one of the components, so it would be misleading to print it in the green column.  On the other hand, you are not going to confirm declining the bundle, because you did buy part of it.  So, in which column does this product belong?

Here are some ideas:

  • The menu system should account for the child products and print them individually on the waiver. It should also count them separately as product sales.
  • The menu system should print the coverage description, and the coverage description should state which components were accepted.
  • Providers should offer bundles all or nothing, and not allow them to be split up.

Unlike Schrödinger, you will not win the Nobel Prize for solving this one – but you can provide some guidance to your fellow F&I practitioners.  Click the link below to register your answer.

Penetration Chart with Bokeh

I have been honing my charting skills lately, because Bokeh is so amazing, and looking for practical applications (outside my stock trading hobby).  Here’s one I found recently.  This chart explores the timeless question, “are product sales off because the dealer isn’t supportive, or are vehicle sales off, too?”

I am thinking of protection products, but the same question could be asked of finance contracts or, indeed, anywhere you need to consider “penetration.”  That is, the percentage of vehicle sales that are also sales of your product.

Are product sales off because the dealer isn’t supportive, or are vehicle sales off, too?

In this chart, we consider year over year change in contracts relative to the change in vehicle sales for a collection of dealers.  Bubble size indicates the size of each dealership in sales volume.  We’ll get to bubble color in a minute.  Also, note the horizontal and vertical zero lines.

The dealers in the lower left quadrant have an excuse.  Riverside, for example, is down 30% in product sales.  When you call them, though, they’ll counter that they’re having a bad year.  Volume is also down, albeit only 11%.

The dealers in the lower right quadrant have no such excuse.  Downtown, for example, is also off 30% but on much improved vehicle sales.  So, we can infer that penetration has declined, and color them a darker shade of red.  Similarly, although contracts are up at National, they should be up more considering the good year they’re having.  So, orange.

O’Malley is green because, while contracts are off a bit, vehicle sales are worse.  O’Malley is doing the right thing and ramping up products to compensate for weak sales.  What the chart shows on the X and Y axes is straightforward enough, but it shrewdly assigns colors according to the change in penetration.

Bokeh is the visualization library Python programmers use instead of R or Matplotlib.  The color scheme here comes from running its red, yellow, green “linear color mapper” diagonally across the chart from lower right to upper left.  Dealers where penetration is unchanged from last year are yellow, like College and Bellevue.

Clampdown Looms for F&I Markup

NADA recently published a policy guide for protection products and we should commend the association for being proactive.  Highlights are below but, if you’re a practitioner, you must read and heed the full document.

  • Consistent presentation, i.e. use a menu
  • Prominent disclosures like the AutoNation pledge
  • Consistent, non-discriminatory pricing
  • Detailed waiver explaining any variance from standard pricing

Why?  Because otherwise dealers and lenders may be prosecuted.  NADA cites the $11 million Santander GAP settlement and the U.S. Bank deceptive marketing settlement.  I can see this going the way of dealer reserve.  Regulators will force lenders to restrict dealers’ discretion in setting markups.

NADA and others have warned on F&I markup since 2013, when the CFPB issued its first subpoenas on the topic, and last year the National Consumer Law Center published their report, subtitled: How dealer discretion drives excessive, arbitrary, and discriminatory pricing.

The chart above is one of several alleging discriminatory pricing in F&I.  As for lender pressure, the NCLC paints a big target on Ally Financial, reminding their readers that “state and federal authorities should investigate … and bring enforcement actions.”

Good operators will not have much to change for the model policy.  The recommended new waiver is a bit cumbersome, but the rest of it is already best practice, like menu selling.  The AutoNation pledge has been around for fifteen years.  Frictionless cancellation is discussed here.

In addition to regulatory pressure, there is also competitive pressure on F&I markup.  I’ll cover that in a later post.  On the bright side, AutoNation is near $2,000 a copy and their compliance has always been excellent.  So, no excuses.

Wanted: eCommerce Product Manager

Things are going well here at Safe-Guard, and I am looking to hire another eCommerce Product Manager.  Posting is here.  We need someone who can not only manage a shopping site but, as we are in the midst of a digital transformation, also establish the required support and fulfillment processes.

The eCommerce department manages the development and support of these properties, whether they are standalone web sites, dealer-site storefronts, or web services … 

The successful candidate will have solid product management experience, and maybe some digital marketing.  Agile development experience a plus.  Self-starter.  Relocation.   Salary commensurate with experience.