Tag: digital

Moto Commerce Digital Retail

Moto Insight has uploaded a complete demo of their digital storefront, Moto Commerce.  This shows confidence that they’re not worried about being copied, or being anatomized by some smart-aleck software consultant.  Here’s how Moto handles the six key functions:

  • Choose a vehicle – Including accessories.  I write a lot about the importance of protection products, but accessories are important too, especially for certain brands like Honda and Subaru.  Everything is shown at MSRP but, because the site is customized for each dealer, I imagine there is some flexibility.
  • Price the vehicle – Including incentives.  No idea whose data service they’re using for this.  I usually recommend Market Scan, but it is possible to roll your own.  Rodo recently developed their own incentives engine.  I tried to coach one of my clients on this, but they wouldn’t do it.
  • Price protection products – Including digital content.  Not clear how finance term is linked to protection term.  Customer could choose, say, 36 months of GAP on a 72-month deal.
  • Value the trade – They use Trade Pending, which I mentioned here, but they also offer a condition quiz with the ability to upload photos.  This is very strong because it allows the Used Car manager to bid on the vehicle during the online experience.
  • Structure the deal – The calculator is always running and continuously updates the monthly payment.  This is one approach to the nonlinear workflow problem, but it also means the customer is looking at an inaccurate payment throughout most of the shopping tasks.
  • Organize financing – Here, again, it’s hard to have confidence in the payment until we’ve processed a credit app.  The demo shows the customer choosing term and rate, as if his credit tier is already known.  Moto pushes to Route One and Dealertrack, but it should also pull.

Overall, Moto is a solid online shopping experience.  It does not literally sell the car, in the sense of doing the paperwork, but it does produce a complete, deliverable deal.  Next, the customer can reserve the vehicle, save the deal, and make an appointment.

The in-store version of Moto uses the same pages, making a seamless “omnichannel” experience for the customer.  This means it’s a potential replacement for your desking and menu systems.  Customers can also begin the process in-store, and take the deal home.

I’ll close with Andrew’s hook from the video.  Imagine your dealership offers this experience, and the other guy has only a lead form.  Which do you think the customer would rather work with?

Digital Transformation Playbook

I read a good book over Christmas break, The Digital Transformation Playbook, by David Rogers.  This is a good book because it has both theory and practice, plenty of research and real-life examples, and practical “how to” guides.

Just when you’re thinking, “oh yeah, when has that ever happened?” Rogers comes up with an example.  Many of the these include commentary from the people who worked on them.  It’s clear that the professor gets out of his classroom for a fair amount of consulting.

Digital transformation is not about technology – it is about strategy and new ways of thinking.

Most books like this focus on digital native startups.  That’s the sexy stuff and, in fact, where I have most of my experience.  I chose this book for its focus on digital transformation, in existing companies and hidebound industries (like auto retail).

The book is organized around five strategic themes: customer networks, platform marketing, upgrading your value proposition, data as an asset, and innovation through experimentation.

I did grow a little impatient with Rogers’ incessant enumerating: five core behaviors, four value templates, three variables, two trajectories (and a partridge in a pear tree) but I appreciated the effort to boil everything down to a foolproof recipe.  There are a number of these:

  • Customer Network Strategy Generator
  • Platform Business Model Map
  • Value Train Analysis
  • Data Value Generator
  • Experimental Design Templates
  • Value Proposition Roadmap
  • Disruptive Business Model Map
  • Disruptive Response Planner
  • Digital Transformation Self-Assessment

I was even inspired to start making value train diagrams of our business, and platform model maps:

On the theory side, Rogers reexamines familiar models from people like Drucker and Levitt.  He shows, for instance, that Christensen’s theory of “digital disruption” is a special case, and broadens it.

By the way, this discussion of digital disruption is one of the most lucid (hype-free) that I have read.  As usual, there is a checklist: analyze three features and choose one of six strategies.  If that doesn’t work then, yes, you’re disrupted.  Time to update your resume.

I read all the time, though I don’t often write book reviews (here is the last one) so Rogers’ fifteen-page bibliography was an extra treat.  That should keep my Kindle stoked for a while.

Wanted: eCommerce Product Manager

Things are going well here at Safe-Guard, and I am looking to hire another eCommerce Product Manager.  Posting is here.  We need someone who can not only manage a shopping site but, as we are in the midst of a digital transformation, also establish the required support and fulfillment processes.

The eCommerce department manages the development and support of these properties, whether they are standalone web sites, dealer-site storefronts, or web services … 

The successful candidate will have solid product management experience, and maybe some digital marketing.  Agile development experience a plus.  Self-starter.  Relocation.   Salary commensurate with experience.