Tag: DR

DR and Dealer Websites

I was chatting with my pal Kiran Karunakaran about his new role at Fox Dealer.  You may recall that Kiran’s DR solution, TagRail, was acquired by Fox earlier this year.  At that time, I figured DR would be an absolute requirement for dealer websites, and I expected to see CDK bid for, say, CarNow.  Here are the pairings:

  • Fox Dealer, TagRail
  • Dealer Inspire, Online Shopper
  • Dealer Fire, Precise Price
  • Dealer eProcess, SARA
  • Dealer.com, Accelerate

Note that, with the exception of TagRail, these DR solutions were all developed by their website partners.  Missing are the pure DR startups I usually write about: Roadster, Modal, and Moto.  Maybe they’re better off uncommitted.  I decided to test this theory with a little research.

I went through Wards’ Top 100 Internet Dealers, identifying the website provider for each one, and their DR solution.  The Wards sample skews strongly toward DDC, at 60%.  The Datanyze survey (chart above) has DDC at 18%.  Remember, I am not looking for market share so much as patterns in DR adoption.

For example, 20% of “top internet dealers” had no DR solution.  That was a surprise.  A few of these had cobbled together the Dealertrack frame with Trade Pending and a homebrew payment calculator – not DR as it is usually defined.

Same-vendor pairings for DR and website were rare

Some dealers use the same website and DR solution across all their stores, and some skip around.  Herb Chambers uses DDC and Darwin faithfully except in his Chevy store, which uses CDK and Shop Click Drive.  Paul Rusnak and Fred Anderson are faithful to Roadster and Gubagoo, respectively, but vary their choice of website providers.  Of course, these choices are often mandated by the manufacturer.

Of manufacturer DR preferences, the best known is probably Shop Click Drive, followed by AutoFi.  AutoFi is historically associated with Ford, and still used mainly by Ford dealers.  I did find one Kia dealer in Peoria using AutoFi.  Chrysler’s DriveFCA is powered by Carzato.

Same-vendor pairings for DR and website were rare, at 12%.  These were almost exclusively DDC with Accelerate.  I found one instance of Dealer Inspire with its mate, Online Shopper.  Free-agent DR solutions did much better than those associated with website providers.  Roadster, Darwin, and CarNow together accounted for 59% of DR in the sample dealerships.

As it happens, CDK did not acquire a DR solution.  Instead, they sold their website business to Sincro, a digital marketing company.  The Sincro announcement reminds us that what I am calling the “website business” may also include digital content, advertising, SEO, social, reputation, CRM, and lead-gen.

The right framework is not DR plus website, or even DR plus website and marketing, but a continuum across the customer journey.  The journey begins with the various marketing services required to land the customer on the website, and ends with point-of-sale (POS) systems like menu and desking.

Recall that Roadster, Darwin, and Moto also play in the POS space.  At the other end, there are pure-play marketing agencies that don’t do websites.  You can evaluate strategy for these companies in terms of where they are concentrated along the journey, and where they are extending.

Dealer Fire moved up funnel, through their partnership with Stream, and Fox extended down a notch with TagRail.  Darwin is unique in having moved to DR from point of sale. (I am using the linear model for simplicity. To account for CRM and reputation, you need the loop model.)

My goal here was to explore the synergy between DR and dealer websites, and the answer is that they’re not as compatible as they appear.  Research showed much less crossover than I had expected, between marketing agencies on one side of the BUY NOW button, and DR specialists on the other.

Digital Retail Taxonomy

The tech buzz at NADA this year was Digital Retail.  Tagrail has a new partnership, with dealer site provider Fox, and Moto showcased some of their OEM projects.  Roadster has an aggregation marketplace, which I’ll get to in a minute, and Modal (Drive) was conspicuously absent.  I hope they’re okay.

All dealer site providers are now claiming the hip acronym DR, including some that are way off the mark.  This week I want to cut through the clutter and taxonomize a bit.  We’ll see how well my predictions from five years ago have held up.

Dealers will migrate onto the most capable of the platform sites, and … the winning platforms will not be mere lead providers.

I am going to skip the consolidators and the used-car sites, to focus on DR solutions for franchised new car dealers.  That was the context for the earlier article (and the pull quote).  The grid above divides the DR space into four segments: True DR, Pivoters, TPC, and Marketplaces.

True Digital Retail

A true DR solution must handle the six canonical functions, do the paperwork online, and save the deal (not a lead) for use in the dealership.  True, not many customers will do the full process online, but you have to offer the capability.  Qualifying questions here are along the lines of “can you sell a service contract and book it online with the administrator?”

I don’t want to be pilloried for omitting someone, but my short list (when asked) goes: Roadster, Moto, Modal, Tagrail, AutoFi, and CarNow.  I can find CarNow dealers pretty easily online, paired with a variety of site providers.  Here in Atlanta, Ed Voyles is an example.

Pivoters

Anybody with a foothold in the dealer’s website is using it to pivot into DR.  The first group of pivoters are what I call “finance first” sites.  AutoGravity, DriveTime, and AutoFi are sites customers use to check their buying power before going into the dealership.  Based on intel from Ricart Ford, I would say that AutoFi has successfully pivoted into the DR segment.

Gubagoo is using their foothold in chat to pivot as “conversational commerce.”  SpinCar is adding protection products to their VDP real estate, which is right where they belong.  Even popular F&I menu Darwin is moving online with Darwin Direct.

Third Party Classifieds

My model for a marketplace is Autotrader plus its DR feature, Accelerate.  However, the other incumbents have not followed suit.  In fact, Cars.com “does not sell vehicles directly and is never a party to any transaction between buyers and sellers.”  This space is inhabited only by brave new entrants like Joydrive, GoGoCar, and Deliver My Ride.

As I wrote here, this model has plenty of challenges, like finding UX and services that will appeal to all dealers – not to mention the customers.  Dealers may prefer a simple clickthrough to their own DR solution.  This is the backdrop for Roadster’s Express Marketplace.

Roadster Marketplace

Roadster’s marketplace operates just like a TPC site.  It has the familiar VSP/VDP with faceted search, but then it segues into a full digital storefront.  The reference site I looked at, Cochran group in suburban Pittsburgh, lists 3,500 new vehicles in 18 makes, from 26 rooftops – with transparent pricing!

My first reaction, I have to say, was “Holy crap, they’ve actually done it!”  They have made their own private Autotrader.  Of course, the same market area lists ten times as many new cars on Autotrader but – funny thing – they all use Accelerate.  Competition is wonderful that way.

The arrows on my grid suggest some strategic directions:

  • Single-function solutions will pivot to become storefronts. AutoFi is an example.
  • Third-party sites will add DR functionality. Accelerate is an example.
  • As storefronts grow to serve dealer groups, they will tend toward marketplaces.

I guess the only remaining frontier would be for two unaffiliated groups to cooperate on a single platform, as I wrote in Toward a Digital Auto Marketplace, maybe in contiguous nonoverlapping markets.  The eCommerce term is “coopetition.”  Or, maybe Accelerate will gain some traction.